Image: NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope provides a close-up look of Comet ISON (C/2012 S1), as photographed on April 10, when the comet was slightly closer than Jupiter’s orbit at a distance of 386 million miles from the sun.

Hubble Captures Comet ISON
This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of Comet (C/2012 S1) ISON was photographed on April 10, when the comet was slightly closer than Jupiter’s orbit at a distance of 386 million miles from the Sun (394 million miles from Earth).Even at that great distance the comet is already active as sunlight warms the surface and causes frozen volatiles to sublimate. A detailed analysis of the dust coma surrounding the solid, icy nucleus reveals a strong, jet blasting dust particles off the sunward-facing side of the comet’s nucleus.Preliminary measurements from the Hubble images suggest that the nucleus of ISON is no larger than three or four miles across. This is remarkably small considering the high level of activity observed in the comet so far, said researchers. Astronomers are using these images to measure the activity level of this comet and constrain the size of the nucleus, in order to predict the comet’s activity when it skims 700,000 miles above the sun’s roiling surface on November 28.The comet’s dusty coma, or head of the comet, is approximately 3,100 miles across, or 1.2 times the width of Australia. A dust tail extends more than 57,000 miles, far beyond Hubble’s field of view.More careful analysis is currently underway to improve these measurements and to predict the possible outcome of the sungrazing perihelion passage of this comet.This image was taken in visible light. The blue false color was added to bring out details in the comet structure.

ImageNASA’s Hubble Space Telescope provides a close-up look of Comet ISON (C/2012 S1), as photographed on April 10, when the comet was slightly closer than Jupiter’s orbit at a distance of 386 million miles from the sun.

Hubble Captures Comet ISON

This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of Comet (C/2012 S1) ISON was photographed on April 10, when the comet was slightly closer than Jupiter’s orbit at a distance of 386 million miles from the Sun (394 million miles from Earth).

Even at that great distance the comet is already active as sunlight warms the surface and causes frozen volatiles to sublimate. A detailed analysis of the dust coma surrounding the solid, icy nucleus reveals a strong, jet blasting dust particles off the sunward-facing side of the comet’s nucleus.

Preliminary measurements from the Hubble images suggest that the nucleus of ISON is no larger than three or four miles across. This is remarkably small considering the high level of activity observed in the comet so far, said researchers. Astronomers are using these images to measure the activity level of this comet and constrain the size of the nucleus, in order to predict the comet’s activity when it skims 700,000 miles above the sun’s roiling surface on November 28.

The comet’s dusty coma, or head of the comet, is approximately 3,100 miles across, or 1.2 times the width of Australia. A dust tail extends more than 57,000 miles, far beyond Hubble’s field of view.

More careful analysis is currently underway to improve these measurements and to predict the possible outcome of the sungrazing perihelion passage of this comet.

This image was taken in visible light. The blue false color was added to bring out details in the comet structure.

(Source: nasa.gov)

@1 year ago with 4 notes
#comet #Comet ISON #hubble #NASA 

@1 year ago
#real life ate my guts #sorry for not posting anything but I am back hopefully #this has been a post 

Image: The bottom two black spots on the sun, known as sunspots, appeared quickly over the course of Feb. 19-20, 2013. These two sunspots are part of the same system and are over six Earths across. This image combines images from two instruments on NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO): the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), which takes pictures in visible light that show sunspots and the Advanced Imaging Assembly (AIA), which took an image in the 304 Angstrom wavelength showing the lower atmosphere of the sun, which is colorized in red.

NASA’s SDO Observes Fast-Growing Sunspot
As magnetic fields on the sun rearrange and realign, dark spots known as sunspots can appear on its surface. Over the course of Feb. 19-20, 2013, scientists watched a giant sunspot form in under 48 hours. It has grown to over six Earth diameters across but its full extent is hard to judge since the spot lies on a sphere not a flat disk.This is a fairly unstable configuration that scientists know can lead to eruptions of radiation on the sun called solar flares.

Image: The bottom two black spots on the sun, known as sunspots, appeared quickly over the course of Feb. 19-20, 2013. These two sunspots are part of the same system and are over six Earths across. This image combines images from two instruments on NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO): the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), which takes pictures in visible light that show sunspots and the Advanced Imaging Assembly (AIA), which took an image in the 304 Angstrom wavelength showing the lower atmosphere of the sun, which is colorized in red.

NASA’s SDO Observes Fast-Growing Sunspot

As magnetic fields on the sun rearrange and realign, dark spots known as sunspots can appear on its surface. Over the course of Feb. 19-20, 2013, scientists watched a giant sunspot form in under 48 hours. It has grown to over six Earth diameters across but its full extent is hard to judge since the spot lies on a sphere not a flat disk.

This is a fairly unstable configuration that scientists know can lead to eruptions of radiation on the sun called solar flares.

(Source: nasa.gov)

@1 year ago with 1 note
#sun #sunspots #solar flare #NASA #NASA Goddard #SDO #space porn #stars 
Colors of the Innermost Planet
This colorful view of Mercury was produced by using images from the color base map imaging campaign during MESSENGER's primary mission. These colors are not what Mercury would look like to the human eye, but rather the colors enhance the chemical, mineralogical, and physical differences between the rocks that make up Mercury’s surface.

Colors of the Innermost Planet

This colorful view of Mercury was produced by using images from the color base map imaging campaign during MESSENGER's primary mission. These colors are not what Mercury would look like to the human eye, but rather the colors enhance the chemical, mineralogical, and physical differences between the rocks that make up Mercury’s surface.

(Source: nasa.gov)

@1 year ago with 13 notes
#space porn #Mercury #MESSENGER #planet #solar system 
M51: The Whirlpool Galaxy in Dust and Stars
The Whirlpool Galaxy is a classic spiral galaxy. At only 30 million light years distant and fully 60 thousand light years across, M51, also known as NGC 5194, is one of the brightest and most picturesque galaxies on the sky. The above image is a digital combination of a ground-based image from the 0.9-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory and a space-based image from the Hubble Space Telescope highlighting sharp features normally too red to be seen. Anyone with a good pair of binoculars, however, can see this Whirlpool toward the constellation of the Hunting Dogs (Canes Venatici). M51 is a spiral galaxy of type Sc and is the dominant member of a whole group of galaxies. Astronomers speculate that M51's spiral structure is primarily due to its gravitational interaction with a smaller galaxy just off the top of the image.

M51: The Whirlpool Galaxy in Dust and Stars

The Whirlpool Galaxy is a classic spiral galaxy. At only 30 million light years distant and fully 60 thousand light years across, M51, also known as NGC 5194, is one of the brightest and most picturesque galaxies on the sky. The above image is a digital combination of a ground-based image from the 0.9-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory and a space-based image from the Hubble Space Telescope highlighting sharp features normally too red to be seen. Anyone with a good pair of binoculars, however, can see this Whirlpool toward the constellation of the Hunting Dogs (Canes Venatici)M51 is a spiral galaxy of type Sc and is the dominant member of a whole group of galaxies. Astronomers speculate that M51's spiral structure is primarily due to its gravitational interaction with a smaller galaxy just off the top of the image.

(Source: apod.nasa.gov)

@1 year ago with 18 notes
#space porn #galaxy #stars #hubble #constellation #Hunting Dogs (Canes Venatici) #M51 #Spiral galaxy 
Distribution of Water in Jupiter’s Stratosphere
This map shows the distribution of water in the stratosphere of Jupiter as measured with the Herschel space observatory. White and cyan indicate highest concentration of water, and blue indicates lesser amounts. The map has been superimposed over an image of Jupiter taken at visible wavelengths with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The distribution of water clearly shows an asymmetric distribution across the planet: water is more abundant in the southern hemisphere. Based on this and other clues collected with Herschel, astronomers have established that at least 95 percent of the water currently present in Jupiter’s stratosphere was supplied by comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, which famously impacted the planet at intermediate southern latitudes in 1994. The map is based on spectrometric data collected with the Photodetecting Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) instrument on board Herschel around 66.4 microns, a wavelength that corresponds to one of water’s many spectral signatures.

Distribution of Water in Jupiter’s Stratosphere

This map shows the distribution of water in the stratosphere of Jupiter as measured with the Herschel space observatory. White and cyan indicate highest concentration of water, and blue indicates lesser amounts. The map has been superimposed over an image of Jupiter taken at visible wavelengths with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. 

The distribution of water clearly shows an asymmetric distribution across the planet: water is more abundant in the southern hemisphere. Based on this and other clues collected with Herschel, astronomers have established that at least 95 percent of the water currently present in Jupiter’s stratosphere was supplied by comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, which famously impacted the planet at intermediate southern latitudes in 1994. 

The map is based on spectrometric data collected with the Photodetecting Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) instrument on board Herschel around 66.4 microns, a wavelength that corresponds to one of water’s many spectral signatures.

(Source: nasa.gov)

@1 year ago with 1 note
#jupiter #distribution of water #hubble #herschel #NASA #planet 
karatam:

stubbornandsolo:

carry-on-my-wayward-butt:

vantasticmess:

w-for-wumbo:

I am so glad someone made this cuz I’ve always wondered how the movement of the solar system might look as a whole….

BUT LOOK HOW EPIC THE SOLAR SYSTEM IS GUYS

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFUUUUUUUUUUUUUCK

Sometimes I forget we are plummeting in space at high velocity…

And there’s even more to it.
The Earth is rotating around the Sun at a speed of 70,000 mph.
The Sun is rotating around the centre of the galaxy at a speed of 560,000 mph.
And the galaxy is moving away from the centre of the universe at a speed of 1,230,000 mph. (-ish, there’s lot’s of debate about this and a lot of it depends on what you’re measuring it against)
So right now, you’re hurtling through space at a speed of about 1,800,000 mph.

karatam:

stubbornandsolo:

carry-on-my-wayward-butt:

vantasticmess:

w-for-wumbo:

I am so glad someone made this cuz I’ve always wondered how the movement of the solar system might look as a whole….

BUT LOOK HOW EPIC THE SOLAR SYSTEM IS GUYS

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFUUUUUUUUUUUUUCK

Sometimes I forget we are plummeting in space at high velocity…

And there’s even more to it.

The Earth is rotating around the Sun at a speed of 70,000 mph.

The Sun is rotating around the centre of the galaxy at a speed of 560,000 mph.

And the galaxy is moving away from the centre of the universe at a speed of 1,230,000 mph. (-ish, there’s lot’s of debate about this and a lot of it depends on what you’re measuring it against)

So right now, you’re hurtling through space at a speed of about 1,800,000 mph.

(via creamsicles-r-delicious)

@1 year ago with 275502 notes
#solar system 
Hubble Sees a Glowing Jet From A Young Star
This image shows an object known as HH 151, a bright jet of glowing material trailed by an intricate, orange-hued plume of gas and dust. It is located some 460 light-years away in the constellation of Taurus (The Bull), near to the young, tumultuous star HL Tau.In the first few hundred thousand years of life, new stars like HL Tau pull in material that falls towards them from the surrounding space. This material forms a hot disc that swirls around the coalescing body, launching narrow streams of material from its poles. These jets are shot out at speeds of several hundred kilometers (or miles) per second and collide violently with nearby clumps of dust and gas, creating wispy, billowing structures known as Herbig-Haro objects — like HH 151 seen in the image.Such objects are very common in star-forming regions. They are short-lived, and their motion and evolution can actually be seen over very short timescales, on the order of years. They quickly race away from the newly-forming star that emitted them, colliding with new clumps of material and glowing brightly before fading away.

Hubble Sees a Glowing Jet From A Young Star

This image shows an object known as HH 151, a bright jet of glowing material trailed by an intricate, orange-hued plume of gas and dust. It is located some 460 light-years away in the constellation of Taurus (The Bull), near to the young, tumultuous star HL Tau.

In the first few hundred thousand years of life, new stars like HL Tau pull in material that falls towards them from the surrounding space. This material forms a hot disc that swirls around the coalescing body, launching narrow streams of material from its poles. These jets are shot out at speeds of several hundred kilometers (or miles) per second and collide violently with nearby clumps of dust and gas, creating wispy, billowing structures known as Herbig-Haro objects — like HH 151 seen in the image.

Such objects are very common in star-forming regions. They are short-lived, and their motion and evolution can actually be seen over very short timescales, on the order of years. They quickly race away from the newly-forming star that emitted them, colliding with new clumps of material and glowing brightly before fading away.

(Source: nasa.gov)

@1 year ago with 9 notes
#stars #NASA #hubble #space porn #constellation #Herbig-Haro #Taurus (The Bull) #HL Tau #Star formation 
Bushveld Igneous Complex
With uses ranging from jewelry to catalytic converters, platinum ranks among the most prized and most expensive metals. About 70 percent of the world’s platinum is mined in the Bushveld Igneous Complex in South Africa—a geological formation roughly the same size as West Virginia. The Bushveld also supplies significant quantities of palladium, rhodium, chromium, and vanadium.
The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired this image of the Bushveld Igneous Complex on October 24, 2006. It shows part of the Bushveld Complex, an area around the Bospoort Dam.
ASTER combines infrared, red, and green wavelengths of light to make false-color images. In this image, water appears in shades of blue, with darker blue indicating greater water depths. The pale blue polygonal shapes indicate reservoirs and tailings ponds associated with mining operations. Bare rock and sparsely vegetated land appear in shades of red and red-brown. Vegetation is green.
Bushveld is an example of a large igneous province, a massive assemblage of rocks formed by volcanic activity. The Bushveld is not only big in land area; its rock layers are several kilometers thick. The complex consists of multiple “suites” of rocks, each of which in turn holds multiple layers. Different layers are sources of different types of valuable metals; some favor platinum, for example, while others are rich in chromium.
Bushveld is unusual in that, despite its great age—more than 2 billion years—it has not been significantly deformed by subsequent tectonic activity. (It has undergone extensive erosion.) Despite years of extensive study in the area, geologists have not reached a consensus about how this igneous complex formed. One hypothesis is that the complex is a single, massive feature shaped like a giant bowl. Others suggest that it consists of discrete, disconnected structures. In either case, the complex might have received multiple infusions of magma from different sources.
Although there is little agreement about precisely how it formed, dating of the rocks from the Bushveld indicates that the igneous complex formed over a relatively short time period, perhaps less than 10 million years. Before dating techniques constrained the ages of the rock layers to a time around 2.06 billion years ago, many geologists suspected that the complex formed over a period that might have exceeded 100 million years.

Bushveld Igneous Complex

With uses ranging from jewelry to catalytic converters, platinum ranks among the most prized and most expensive metals. About 70 percent of the world’s platinum is mined in the Bushveld Igneous Complex in South Africa—a geological formation roughly the same size as West Virginia. The Bushveld also supplies significant quantities of palladium, rhodium, chromium, and vanadium.

The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired this image of the Bushveld Igneous Complex on October 24, 2006. It shows part of the Bushveld Complex, an area around the Bospoort Dam.

ASTER combines infrared, red, and green wavelengths of light to make false-color images. In this image, water appears in shades of blue, with darker blue indicating greater water depths. The pale blue polygonal shapes indicate reservoirs and tailings ponds associated with mining operations. Bare rock and sparsely vegetated land appear in shades of red and red-brown. Vegetation is green.

Bushveld is an example of a large igneous province, a massive assemblage of rocks formed by volcanic activity. The Bushveld is not only big in land area; its rock layers are several kilometers thick. The complex consists of multiple “suites” of rocks, each of which in turn holds multiple layers. Different layers are sources of different types of valuable metals; some favor platinum, for example, while others are rich in chromium.

Bushveld is unusual in that, despite its great age—more than 2 billion years—it has not been significantly deformed by subsequent tectonic activity. (It has undergone extensive erosion.) Despite years of extensive study in the area, geologists have not reached a consensus about how this igneous complex formed. One hypothesis is that the complex is a single, massive feature shaped like a giant bowl. Others suggest that it consists of discrete, disconnected structures. In either case, the complex might have received multiple infusions of magma from different sources.

Although there is little agreement about precisely how it formed, dating of the rocks from the Bushveld indicates that the igneous complex formed over a relatively short time period, perhaps less than 10 million years. Before dating techniques constrained the ages of the rock layers to a time around 2.06 billion years ago, many geologists suspected that the complex formed over a period that might have exceeded 100 million years.

(Source: earthobservatory.nasa.gov)

@1 year ago with 3 notes
#Geology #metals #NASA #Buchveld Igneous Complex #rocks #geological formation #ASTER #Terra 
Cassini at Saturn’s Bow Shock
This artist’s impression by the European Space Agency shows NASA’s Cassini spacecraft exploring the magnetic environment of Saturn. The image is not to scale. Saturn’s magnetosphere is depicted in grey, while the complex bow shock region – the shock wave in the solar wind that surrounds the magnetosphere – is shown in blue. While crossing the bow shock on Feb. 3, 2007, Cassini recorded a particularly strong shock in a “quasi-parallel” orientation, where the magnetic field and the direction of the front of the shock’s movement are almost aligned. Under these conditions, significant particle acceleration was detected for the first time. The findings provide insight into particle acceleration at the shocks surrounding the remnants of stellar explosions.

Cassini at Saturn’s Bow Shock

This artist’s impression by the European Space Agency shows NASA’s Cassini spacecraft exploring the magnetic environment of Saturn. The image is not to scale. Saturn’s magnetosphere is depicted in grey, while the complex bow shock region – the shock wave in the solar wind that surrounds the magnetosphere – is shown in blue. 

While crossing the bow shock on Feb. 3, 2007, Cassini recorded a particularly strong shock in a “quasi-parallel” orientation, where the magnetic field and the direction of the front of the shock’s movement are almost aligned. Under these conditions, significant particle acceleration was detected for the first time. The findings provide insight into particle acceleration at the shocks surrounding the remnants of stellar explosions.

(Source: nasa.gov)

@1 year ago with 8 notes
#saturn #Cassini #NASA #planet #ESA